What’s Cooking, 2019?

You look absolutely stunning, obviously. Still, this time of year, many folks are inclined to reevaluate their eating habits. Maybe you want to drop a few pounds or would like to feel healthier. Maybe your friends have all gone paleo, and you don't want to be voted out of the tribe. Maybe eating broccoli just makes you feel superior. All of these are great reasons to tweak your diet.

Whatever your motivation, we all have to eat, and that Instant Pot you got over the holidays isn’t going to fill itself. Hopefully these well-reviewed new books can provide some encouragement, fresh ideas, and more than a few delicious recipes.

Dressing on the Side (and Other Diet Myths Debunked): 11 Science-Based Ways to Eat More, Stress Less, and Feel Great About Your Body by Jaclyn London

“... a 'do less' strategy for weight loss and eating a healthier diet… London will leave dieters feeling inspired and reassured.” —via Publishers Weekly

Blunt, insightful, and laugh-out-loud funny, London brings a fresh perspective on diets to the self-help genre.” —via Booklist

Fit Men Cook by Kevin Curry

“...full of sturdy and flavorful ingredients and recipes designed for those who want to cook a couple times a week in batches large enough to last several days.” —via Publishers Weekly

The Elephant in the Room: One Fat Man's Quest to Get Smaller in a Growing America by Tommy Tomlinson

“In this revealing memoir, journalist Tomlinson...shares the story of his battle with weight gain and loss during his lifetime… An authentic look at a struggle that millions of Americans face every day.” —via Kirkus

“...readers are likely to identify with at least some of what [Tomlinson] says about addiction and holding himself back from life…[and] conflating food with love and connection...” —via Booklist

The Keto Reset Diet Cookbook by Mark Sisson

“In this solid, informative follow-up to The Keto Reset Diet, Sisson includes 150 recipes to give initiates as well as longtime followers more ketogenic mealtime options.”  —Publishers Weekly

Clean Enough: Get Back to Basics and Leave Room for Dessert by Katzie Guy-Hamilton

“Home cooks will be bolstered by Guy-Hamilton's accessible, non-restrictive recipes.” —Publishers Weekly

Gut Reactions: the Science of Weight Gain and Loss by Simon Quellen Field

“A handy introduction to a hefty health predicament.” —Booklist

The Whole-Body Microbiome: How to Harness Microbiomes--Inside and Out--For Lifelong Health by B. Brett Finlay

“...[the authors] make a strong case for the microbiome as an exciting new frontier in health research” —Publishers Weekly

“Recommended for readers seeking scientifically accurate consumer health information on the microbiome's relationship to adult health and aging.” —Library Journal

Fix-it and Forget-it Healthy 5-Ingredient Cookbook: 150 Easy and Nutritious Slow Cooker Recipes by Hope Comerford

“...150 easy slow cooker recipes… readers with dietary restrictions will appreciate the book's recommendations for salt-free, gluten-free, and fat-free variations, when applicable.”  —Publishers Weekly

Keto Cooking with Your Instant Pot: Recipes for Fast and Flavorful Ketogenic Meals by Dr. Karen S Lee

“...these meals are global in scope and thrive under pressure.” —Publishers Weekly

Korean Paleo by Jean Choi

“...straightforward, traditional dishes… This is a terrific and flavorful addition to the ever-expanding paleo/Whole30 library.” —Publishers Weekly

The Eating Instinct by Virginia Sole-Smith

“…[Sole-Smith’s]  narrative leads readers toward a better understanding and acceptance of individual instincts...a worthwhile read for anyone with anxieties about food.” —Kirkus

“…readers wishing to learn more about disordered eating as well as those looking to be more mindful about food and the social messaging around it, will find this work useful.” —Library Journal

—Ransom Jabara is a Collection Development Librarian at Lawrence Public Library.

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