Do You Know What Adults Should Read? Kids Books!

Hi, you! Welcome to this corner of the library (well, virtually). I’m Anita---I do storytimes and work in the children’s section. You might find me in the library wearing cat ears or rainbow colored jackets, but most likely I’ll be sitting in a half-circle of children’s books, which is still a good place to be if there was any.

I’m here to tell you that adults should read kids books too. I know it sounds odd,  but here’s the thing: these books bring joy!!! Sir Simon will make you laugh at how a ghost tries to do human chores after attempting to con a little boy into doing his ghostly duties (spoiler alert: they become sweet friends at the end). Books like Kiss it Better and Can I Give You A Squish? Will make you say awwww at how people can love each other. See? Even reading some of these descriptions, I bet your interest is piqued.

Here are some more reasons to read:

First: You might literally lack the time, energy, or interest in reading a book geared towards adults.
Cue picture books and graphic novels. They’re sweet and you’ll finish them before you fall asleep.

Second: They offer a sense of wonder and uplifting energy. Entering into adulthood, it seems like I am overwhelmed or stressed about many little things. Kids books allow us to pause, focus on one thing, and leave feeling a little lighter and calmer. 

Third: They’re reminders on how to be. Sometimes we forget our Kindergarten rules. Kids books will remind you about what to do, how you can take a chance in being kind and vulnerable in order to make a friend, and the fact that sometimes all you really do need is to be a little silly (Sandra Boynton books, my friends?).

Fourth: It’s an olive branch for connecting with people, whether they be kids or people who have kids. You can strike up conversations anywhere and with anyone if you know some of the literature they’re reading.

Fifth: You might see yourself in them in a way you weren’t able to when you were younger. Recently, there has been an influx of books that represent more diverse characters and upbringings. I see books like Eyes That Kiss in the Corners  and Home Is in Between that celebrate and explain different cultures, and it brings me a lot of joy. Kids will have what we didn’t when we were young, and that’s a good thing. So that’s the tea, as they say. I know people use the term for sharing gossip, but I’d rather be talking about books over tea anyways.

Which reminds me that you should check out The Tea Dragon Society as well. K. O'Neill's illustration? I'm in loveeee!

Want to read more children's books? I've included a list of them below. Don't forget Check out our Display -- Picture Books for Adults -- in the Reader's Section, from October 26th - November 16th!

Children's Books For Adults

Children's books have a myriad of offerings to older readers as well. Dive In!










We are all grumpy sometimes, so a relatable title.



You know that emoji with the eyes with unshed tears that you use when something is incredibly sweet? You use that for this book. It talks about a little girl that finds beauty in herself, her mother, and her grandmother through their eyes. All good feelings!

When coming from two cultures, sometimes it's hard to love and figure out what home is. Maybe you didn't have books like these when you were growing up, but they're here now, and can make you feel validated.

Little dragons that have horns with tea leaves on them that make magical teas? Sweet people who learn how to take care of them and end up falling in love? A gentle romance and coming of age story? Sign yourself up!

View Full List

We welcome your respectful and on-topic comments and questions in this limited public forum. To find out more, please see Appropriate Use When Posting Content. Community-contributed content represents the views of the user, not those of Lawrence Public Library