The Library Mission Accomplished: How I learned, connected, created — and grew a baby!

For someone who's grown up with a phone in their pocket, constant access to Google, and is a frequent library-goer, it’s natural to want answers and help right away.

When I found out I was pregnant, immediate panic set in. What does this mean?! What was happening to my body?! What does this mean for my life?! I needed answers.

Luckily, as a children’s librarian I have a leg up. I’m around kids all the time, I know a bit about child development, and have access to every resource Lawrence Public Library has to offer: books and online learning tools, daily storytimes, and so much more.

I don’t know what I would've done without this place. Pregnancy is a psychological war zone and an emotional journey paired with an insane physical toll. Not only are you growing a human, but you’re supposed to know things about said human.

Sure, working here has given me access to a wealth of information on my pregnancy journey, but it has also connected me with a community experienced in childbirth and raising kids. I've gotten tons of valuable advice and knowledge from other parents. Patrons have given me toys, let me borrow books, and my colleagues threw me the most awesome — and sparkliest — baby shower.

Lawrence Public Library may be made of wood, brick, and glass, but it's filled with a living, breathing community built to support and nurture everyone who needs it. If you’re feeling lost and alone on your journey to becoming a parent, we're here for you.

I'm so thankful to have a hand in creating LPL's newest patron: my future library lover arrives in November!

 

Want to connect with some of my favorite pregnancy resources? The list below compiles some of my favorites!

Lauren's Favorite LPL Pregnancy Resources

List created by LPL_LaurenT

Growing a baby and becoming a parent is a daunting task. Luckily, LPL (and myself) are here to help. Here's some of my favorite LPL books, programs, resources and links to other good stuff to help you start your information upload. I've sorted into "Pregnancy" and "Parenthood" with all the pregnancy books and resources up front and the what happens next books and resources after.

I didn't get this book before I was well into my 2nd trimester, but man I wish I had had it for the first. I was loathe to buy in, but Oster sold me on her no-nonsense approach to making decisions. Do what's best for you, your body and your baby. I wish more doctors (and random people giving you advice) would tell you that as well!

Oster follows up Expecting Better from Birth to the first 3 years or so. This book had the same effect as the first: it made me feel empowered about the decisions I make for myself and will make for my child. Essentially: don't sweat the small stuff, your kid will turn out fine.

It's pretty hard for me to say no to something that has "feminist" in the title. I first heard about this book listening to NPR and it sounded fascinating. While definitely not a "how to" or a "trimester by trimester" approach, Garbes does a great job of talking about pregnancy through a feminist lens and how to celebrate your body and this crazy, amazing journey.

I'll be honest and say I haven't read this from cover to cover. My husband has tracked along with me and my pregnancy, but it's a little too clinical and too much of an information dump for me to handle. But I will say that the index in the back has been a life saver whenever I need to look up a quick question or reference for something weird that is happening.

Unlike some of the other books marketed for new dads, my husband is really enjoying this one. He said it has great information, talks to you like an adult that's been reading other pregnancy books (not a know-nothing deadbeat), and does a good job of explaining the process of fatherhood.

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